11.06.18

Two Studies Measure Performance of Acuvue Oasys with Transitions Light Intelligent Technology Contact Lenses

Source: Johnson & Johnson Vision

Johnson & Johnson Vision announced that data from two new studies on the visual effects of photochromic contact lenses were presented at the 2018 American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting in San Antonio. These are the first scientific presentations focused on photochromic contact lens technology since the lenses received 510(k) clearance from the FDA in April.

Comparing the visual effects of photochromic and clear contact lenses

In a study of 58 subjects, there was a clear benefit to visual function when comparing the activated photochromic contact lens with a transparent contact lens on the same individual in simulated sunlight conditions. Specifically, compared to eyes wearing transparent contact lenses, eyes wearing the photochromic contact lenses experienced, on average:

  • 43% faster photostress recovery (vision recovering after exposure to bright light); in a real-world scenario, this can represent up to five seconds faster recovery of vision
  • 38% less squint
  • 27% less impairment of vision (when bright light reduces visibility, or disrupts vision)
  • 32% improved chromatic contrast (when one color stands out more than another)

“In real-world environments, people are exposed to a variety of lighting conditions, and sunlight can be one of the most disruptive conditions for eyes and visual function,” Billy R. Hammond, PhD, Professor of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at the University of Georgia, said in a company news release. “Based on these study results, we see that photochromic contact lenses can provide true visual benefits during outdoor activities.” 

Dr. Hammond will present study findings at Academy 2018 San Antonio on November 7, 1:15 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. in Room 303 of the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. Dr. Hammond’s research was funded by Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc.

Photochromic contact lenses’ impact on daytime and nighttime driving performance

In daytime and nighttime driving conditions, 24 subjects wearing photochromic contact lenses demonstrated equal or better performance across several measures compared to subjects wearing transparent contact lenses alone or with photochromic spectacles.

“Interestingly, subjects wearing the photochromic contact lenses were able to read road signs from about 17.8 meters farther away at night than subjects wearing non-photochromic lenses” said John R. Buch, OD, Senior Principal Research Optometrist at Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Inc.  

Dr. Buch will present study findings during Academy 2018 San Antonio, November 8, 8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. in Hemisfair Ballroom C1 of the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center.

Availability of Acuvue Oasys with Transitions Light Intelligent Technology

Earlier this year, Johnson & Johnson Vision announced it had received 510(k) clearance from the FDA for Acuvue Oasys with Transitions Light Intelligent Technology, a first-of-its-kind contact lens that provides wearers with vision correction and a dynamic photochromic filter that helps to continuously balance the amount of light entering the eye for all-day soothing vision. These contact lenses quickly and seamlessly adjust from clear to dark in response to changing light conditions, reducing exposure to bright light indoors and outdoors, including filtering blue light and blocking UV rays. Acuvue Oasys with Transitions Light Intelligent Technology will be available in the United States in the first half of 2019.

For more information about Johnson & Johnson Vision at Academy 2018, visit www.jnjvisionpro.com/academy.

 

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