10.21.19

Visual Learning Assessments Enable Optometrists to Offer Second Opinion on Child Learning Disorders

Source: RightEye

RightEye announced that it has released a new educational guide–Reading & Learning: Guide to Growing Your Optometry Practice–designed to help optometrists realize the benefits of integrating visual learning assessments into their practices. This guide provides tips on different ways that optometrists can expand their service offering with minimal investment—and help their patients discover the love of learning through improved reading comprehension. The guide also provides sample revenue models designed to help optometrists understand the business potential for integrating visual learning and reading assessments into their practice.

“Vision-related reading and learning disabilities affect 25 percent of students.1 Sadly, many go undiagnosed, or worse, get misdiagnosed with complex cognitive disorders and treated with drugs, when a simple eye tracking test would have uncovered the real issue,” Barbara Barclay, President of RightEye, said in a company news release. “All students should be provided with access to tools to help them succeed in the classroom, and thus, RightEye is on a mission to help ODs understand the immense benefits afforded by integrating reading assessments into their practices.”

Strong readers tend to be more confident, more articulate, and perform better in school. But a child with an undiagnosed eye-movement disorder may not be able to keep pace with their peers in school, and may suffer in other areas of development, too. Eye-movement disorders often get miscategorized as other types of ailments such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other learning disabilities. This is because oculomotor dysfunction results in similar symptoms, such as difficulty concentrating, short attention span and poor reading comprehension.

RightEye offers solutions designed to make assessing patients for eye-movement behavior issues with automated, objective eye-tracking tests. RightEye testing provides doctors with a comprehensive, easy-to-read report that covers numerous facets of the patient’s vision and potential issues, helping them to prescribe an appropriate therapy for correcting problems and maximizing visual performance.

“Every day in your practice, you see patients with functional vision problems that affect their ability to read and learn—whether you know it or not. Simply by doing a better job of screening for these problems, a practice could potentially add reading services without any outside referrals at all,” said Thomas R. Doud, OD, Hartland Eye Care, Hartland, MI.

To learn more about the benefits of adding visual learning services to one’s practice and to download RightEye’s new educational guide, Reading & Learning: Guide to Growing Your Optometry Practice, please visit Righteye.com/reading-guide.

Source:

  1. Rosen WB. The Hidden Link Between Vision and Learning

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